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a writer's life Blowing my own trumpet Horror Planet Poetry Poetry Prose Short Stories

Now, where was I?

I just finished another freelance job last night. And feel like a young otter released back into the wild. Is it just me, or do you do this too? As soon as I create a clear and focused plan about what I am going to do in my life, something else happens. My noble literary plans this year have been swept off the table by the Mr Hyde of my commercial writing alter ego. One of the downsides about leading a double life, along with those mysterious bloodstains, is that I often have had to ration the time I spend on things that give me joy: writing poems, fiction and making the Planet Poetry podcast with my pal Robin Houghton, to focus on filling the echoey Kenny coffers with a few doubloons.

In a few lucid moments, I have written several new poems and many of them sparked by diagnosing a fault in my writing: wanting to be likeable. So I have begun writing poems that do me no credit as a human being, but are at least honest. In my own mind I find writing about my ‘unfinest’ hours is actually quite liberating. One of these new-for-me poems was accepted by Richard Skinner for his stylish 14 Magazine which only prints poems of 14 lines.

Here’s the poem…

This is not exactly confessional poetry. But at the poem’s heart is a real death of a former friend and my own shabby response to it. Remembering this makes me physically squirm as I sit at my desk. In fact I have decided that if the new ‘unfinest hour’ poem I’m working on isn’t making me cringe, then it just ain’t working.

I also had a poem in Jan Heritage’s excellent Finished Creatures magazine. And even attended a reading organised by Jan in Lewes. It was great to go there, hear poets read poems and bask in the sunshine having beers with some of my favourites. This poem was about the Mezquita, which readers of this blog may remember me banging on about here.

Meanwhile my stealthy and malevolent progress in horror continues. My tale The Grieving was published in Supernatural Tales 46 — edited by David Longhorn. Suitably gruesome cover art by Sam Dawson and crammed with excellent tales — from Kathy Hubbard, Sam Dawson, Jane Jakeman, Michael Chislett, Tim Jeffreys and Jon Barron.

The Grieving is about an art piece that sends the nephew of the artist mad with grief, and is underpinned by anxiety, and unpleasant feelings about family. Which is all good stuff if you are trying to write weird fiction. You can buy a copy from the supernatural tales site (link above) or download a copy here.

Categories
Fiction Guernsey Guernsey Literature Prose Short Stories

Supernatural Tales 41, Autumn 2019

As a horror and weird fiction newbie, I’m delighted to have my first story The Inheritor in Supernatural Tales, edited tirelessly by David Longhorn. My tale is set in Guernsey, and draws on my childhood experiences of living in my Grandparent’s haunted 16th century granite cottage.

The story concerns the return of an exile, a burial and a the return to a haunted house (see above). You’ll be pleased to learn it all ends horrifically. I preface The Inheritor with a quote by Victor Hugo, who lived on the island.

‘Houses resemble those who dwell in them, and can, as it were, die…  These weird looking abodes are not rare in the Channel Islands; all agricultural and seafaring classes have a strong faith in the active agency of Satan.’

Victor Hugo, The Toilers of the Sea

The table of contents has some heavy hitting horror and weird fiction writers. Chuffed to be among them.

  • That the Sea Shall Be Calm by David Surface
  • Pertrichor by Sam Dawson
  • Old Habits by Stephen Cashmore
  • The Sea Man by James Machin
  • Sorrow is the Mother of the World by Jeremy Schiliewe
  • The Inheritor by Peter Kenny
  • No Passage Landward by Steve Duffy.

You can buy your copy of Supernatural Tales here.